Nudging Better Attendance

We have a similar problem in our school and have been doing the same thing. Ironically one parent commented to me they want less messages about attendance but if they need to hear the message then they need to hear the message!

@LeadingLearner

Working in a disadvantaged community or a school with large numbers of pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds is a bit of a challenge.  Normal rules apply but there is a need to go the extra mile, insisting and working hard at things other schools take for granted; it can be exhausting.

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Influencing Others by @Mroberts90Matt

As part of my NPQML, may main task is to evidence that I have developed my leadership against certain ‘competencies’ of effective leadership. I was asked to share a 360 Diagnostic Review of my perceived leadership with leaders in my school context. One of my areas to focus on was ‘Influencing Others’.

Fast-forward several months and I have presented the main staff meeting to the majority of the staff about my initiative that I want to implement about Talk4Maths. Many steps have followed before – research, presenting to SLT, forming a team, trialling the Talk4Maths amongst other things. This was a massive learning experience for me. I’m sure some that read this will be very used to presenting about educational matters but this was my first time to try and influence others to act on what I was going on about in front of them. These are some of the things that I have learnt about trying to influence educational change:

1. Clear knowledge and understanding

One thing I recognised straight away was the need to know what I was talking about. I had become so convinced that the Talk4Maths strategy had an impact on children’s learning and would particularly be useful for our 80% of EAL learners in our school. However, it was important to demonstrate this certainty with a backing of theory and research which proved that. Not only that, but I had to convey this in a way that would make sense. I am very good at rushing through concepts because I am aware of them (a habit I had to curtail in my classroom practice in my teacher training).

2. Build a rapport

In our school we have had many speakers and consultants come and go and there is one thing that rings true from the best ones – they related to the listeners. I could have easily given a crystal-clear, knowledgeable presentation, faultless in knowledge and understanding but lost the audience. If I did not try to relate to the listeners then I would quickly be glazed over and the valuable learning I was trying to present would be wasted. It can be done very simply. For example, when I presented the training, we had not had a functioning colour printer for a few days – something that was becoming a running joke between the staff (it had to be a joke, otherwise we would be very annoyed). So, at a point in the training I gave a handout but of course the beautiful colour had been lost. I made a quick comment, they chuckled and we continued. Now, not the best joke but it showed a moment of togetherness, of ‘isn’t this silly right?’ which would have endeared…well maybe only one or two. This was not the only example but one that comes to mind.

3. Interactivity

I hate nothing more than a presentation where I sit and am talked at. We would condemn teachers that do this to children, so why would leaders in education who should be modelling excellent teaching and learning find it acceptable. Okay – the whole ‘teacher talk’ is different to staff CPD than it is in the classroom. ‘Teacher talk’ is required in staff CPD and teachers, as professionals, should be expected to listen and take in information attentively, no matter how little interaction there is. However, again the most memorable CPD I’ve had includes interactive activities, preferably demonstrating the concept or information we are trying to get to grips with.

As with most of my blog posts, there are probably more things that I’ve missed on my non-exhaustive list of things that help us influence others but I’d love to hear more from you!

Boosters… Must Be Spring! by @Mroberts90Matt

The nights are getting shorter, the weather is getting milder (kind of) and the half terms are getting shorter! Although, Year 6 teachers know what this means.

“Oh, there you are [insert Year 6 teacher name], I believe you have 55% of your children working at expected in Maths. What are you planning on doing to improve this?”

“Well [insert Head name] I was thinking about trying my hardest in every Maths session and increasing the amount of Maths sessions in these children’s school weeks.”

“Oh great! Thanks [insert Year 6 teacher name]…anything else?”

“Err…no. Is there anything else you think I could do?”

“Wellllll…..I was just wondering if you could think of anything else, maybe extra opportunities outside of school time?”

“…”

The thing is about boosters, in all the schools I know (I know there may be some that will do this), sessions based on the premise of ‘boosting’ children’s attainment are found uniquely in Year 6 (in Primary Education) and maybe Year 2 (sadly). Yes I know there are ‘Maths Clubs’ and ‘Book Clubs’ and ‘Reading Breakfast Clubs’ but I am talking about the groups that are formed for the sole purpose of raising children’s attainment to increase percentages of children at the expected level.

Why is this? I know the answer is fairly obvious but surely, if children are ‘boosted’ at other points in their school life, there will be less need for such a grand boosting in Year 6.

Of course, I am not suggesting that all teachers should be expected to hold boosting sessions outside of school hours. To do so would be unacceptable and beyond the job description of teacher’s employment. However, if Year 6 teachers continue this acceptance (as I have) of holding booster classes a half term or two before the SATs, will other teachers eventually be made to feel obligated to ‘boost’ their children to raise attainment in their cohorts?

This is dangerous ground.

Having said this – the above dialogue is fabricated. Whilst I’m sure it does happen (Year 6 teachers being encouraged to hold booster sessions) this did not happen to me or my Year partner this year. We voluntarily offered to hold a 50min session each week…why??

I will give two reasons why:

1 – Support the school

I love the school I work at. I think it is such a vibrant place and it is continuing to get even better. As such, I feel a certain level of duty, or loyalty, to it. After all, it is the place that gave me my first teaching post, trusted me to teach in Year 6 straight away (one of my personal goals) and have literally provided for me to embark on the leadership path I want to take. Therefore, I want to produce the best results from this Year 6 cohort that I can to provide protection and evidence for when external eyes come looking and to develop the school’s reputation as one of the best.

2 – Support the child

This is the major reason. Ironically, the results of the tests that my Year 6 cohort sit will not have a direct impact on their pathway in life. However, this test to the child is of vital importance. Whether this sense of importance has been imposed by parents, teachers, the government or the child themselves is irrelevant. Whilst a few will not mind what result they get, two years of giving results one-by-one to my previous classes show the majority really care. I remember vividly in my 2014-15 class giving a Maths result to one of the children. She achieved a Level 3 but I know she was capable of a Level 4. She was gutted. I find myself not wanting this to be a regular occurrence. Therefore, I boost.

As Year 6 practitioners, if we have chosen to support and boost our children outside of school hours then this is admirable. However, we must make this choice carefully, in order to avoid creating a culture of expectation, rather than voluntary.

 

Initial Thoughts on Whole Class Guided Reading @Mroberts90Matt

So, a few days into a new journey for me. Guided reading at my school setting has been quite transient over the past few years I’ve been teaching there. I will list the various ways it has been implemented and consider the pros and cons of each. Over the 2 1/2 years I have tried three different styles of delivering Guided Reading and to hear anyone’s thoughts on the various styles would be much appreciated!

1 hour focus session a week

This was a style of Guided Reading I had never seen before and I doubt I will ever see again. Simply put, this style entails splitting the whole class into 4/5 groups once a week for an hour. Within that hour, all the TAs available in that Phase Group were pooled together so that each group would have a focus for a whole hour. So let’s have a look at this…unique style:

+Far more time to explore a text with a supporting adult
+More time to try and integrate more drama-based activities to enhance understanding of text
– Not every child is read with by the class teacher, only one group
– Only one GR session a week per child
– Highly reliant on all additional adults being available
– Requires a lot of different learning spaces to make most of benefits

Carousel Guided Reading

This is the regular version of Guided Reading. The Dairy Milk, the Ready Salted, the Kit Kat classic if you will. Wherever you’ve seen Guided Reading, this is probably the style you’ve seen implemented. Put simply, the class are split once again into around 5 groups and each day for 20-30 mins (depending on how long it takes your kids to actually figure out where they’re sitting and which daily activity they’re on) each group is undertaking a different activity and complete all of them in a week. Once again, benefits and negatives include:

+ An opportunity for a variety of challenges
+ Chn (in theory) become more independent
+ Teacher gets to work with everyone at some point in focused reading once a week
– Differentiation is a nightmare
– Chn from other groups will interrupt you when in discussion with focus group
– Due to different texts in each group, some do not access higher level texts
– Depending on the age and independence of your age group, setting up and settling can be tedious

Whole Class Guided Reading

This is the new craze that seems to be sweeping the Twitterverse. Quite a few Literacy leads (including my own) are raving about whole class guided reading. This is the reason why I am going to be trying it out this half term. The premise as far as I understand it is the class are introduced to the text/chapter/section all together (perhaps with a hook) to engage. Then they all read independently and the teacher moves to work with a focus group during the next section whilst the rest answer a variety of questions on the section they are working on and this lasts over 2-4 days depending on the Year Group. Once again, benefits and negatives are:

+All engage with higher level vocab from a higher level text
+Opportunity for all chn to access deeper thinking through peer discussion
+Less workload in terms of differentiation
+All chn receive some level of input from class teacher every day
+Less need for ‘set-up’ time
-Perhaps less of a chance for a variety of activities (but depends on how it’s implemented)
-Harder to integrate speaking and listening activities which the teacher can monitor and assess with it being a whole class task

By by non-exhaustive thinking, Whole Class Guided Reading should be the more effective method but many will have their opinions and other benefits and negatives to add (or maybe take away). Half our staff are trialling Carousel with One Text for All and half are trialling Whole Class with One Text for All. I had set up my carousel really effectively so I was a little reluctant but we were meant to trial as a Year Group and my Year 6 partner is the English Lead so I had little choice! However the class seem to be enjoying it so far!

Leadership/Management – A Continuum or Separate Skills by @Mroberts90Matt

1

So – a quick one this week. I am intent on keeping up a weekly post but am now starting to flag with the depth of them.

Posted above I have pasted a model which was shared at a recent discussion on my NPQML course. It is a clear model which puts the relationship between leadership and management on a continuum. We were asked to reflect on our current roles and responsibilities in our setting and what we thought the majority of our time was spent on. The further to the left we place a cross and we are spending more of our time on management tasks than leadership tasks. The further to the right, then vice versa!

The question I have is this – can leadership and management be placed on a continuum? It quickly became apparent that we cannot view a leader being only focused on leadership skills or only on management skills. A leader who has leadership skills but no management has great ideas but cannot put them into action. A leader who has management skills but no leadership traits runs a very tight ship but that ship will have no direction and therefore no progress.

Thus, if we place leadership and management on a continuum, it suggests to me that these traits are a case of “either/or” rather than separate skills which a leader should select behaviours from in the right scenarios. Of course, some could argue that this continuum model does not indicate that leadership and management are skills that we choose “either/or” but it just analyses where a leader spends most of their time.

I don’t have a better solution but I feel that this can cause some confusion – particularly if used an a course which introduces new leaders to the debate of leadership and management. What happens from this is a group of new leaders who feel that a leader who spends some time on management tasks is not as an effective leader than one who spends all their time on leadership tasks. Although some would argue this is the case.

Well, hopefully you can make some sense out of that jumble of thoughts!

Eradicating Maths Anxiety by @Mroberts90Matt

I recently came across this post bringing up an issue in Mathematics which has an impact on learning across the nation, for adults and children:

http://ukedchat.com/2015/08/31/maths-anxiety-by-mathscraftgame/

The natural reaction to anxiety in Maths is avoidance. Even in members of teaching staff there are some who feel they are ‘no good’ at Maths and therefore they avoid all possible interaction with the subject. Of course, when children are then raised by these parents with anxiety about Maths, this attitude can be passed on.

The biggest challenge we face as teachers in Mathematics is encouraging those children who experienced doubt or anxiety to engage fully – otherwise these children may fall further and further behind. As such it is vital for all Maths practitioners to identify what can cause anxiety in Maths and how they can support learners to either avoid this anxiety or guide them through it. And is anxiety even a bad thing?

1. Parental Influence

Children receive the strongest influence in their early development by experiences in the home. They are moulded and taught there first. Parents teach (actively and passively) behaviours and preferences to their children. This can be magnify feelings about Maths. If parents convey negative messages about Maths (or indeed any other subject), that is more likely to rub off onto the child. Of course, this is not guaranteed but it can be a factor. If a parent also experiences maths anxiety, they are likely to avoid it and therefore not support their child as much.

As teachers and schools, we can support parents and therefore children through this. We can provide experiences for parents where they can begin to understand the way that maths is taught to their children and how they can support their child in simple ways. Events such as subject workshops, Curriculum Meetings and Parents Evenings are vital moments where change can happen in the children’s home. With the support from home, children can then begin to feel supported in all areas of their life and feel less anxiety about maths.

2. Ethos of the Classroom

As a teacher, I still have a lot to learn. I am only in my third year of teaching and I recognise I still need to develop in a number of areas. Something which I feel strongly about though is developing the correct ethos in the classroom. Whilst there are times for high-stakes learning, children need to feel secure in making mistakes. If they make mistakes, these are big steps in their learning journey. For any subject, it is vital for children to feel they can take ownership of their learning without worrying about feeling they will be looked down on (by their peers or staff) for making a mistake.

I think about my ability in Art. If I were to go to an Art workshop today then I would certainly feel anxiety. A scene involving stick men is beyond me. However, I know that if i were placed in a scenario that I would not be belittled or looked down on for my ‘weakness’ then I would be more likely to have a go with the task that I was given.

3. A strict diet of problem solving

This may seem like an odd strategy for tackling anxiety – placing children in situations early on where there may be an increased likelihood of anxiety. However, if children are trained to take on problem solving challenges more, rather than comfortable pages of rote calculations, then they will develop their problem solving toolbox more for later on.

The average score in the 2016 KS2 SATs Arithmetic paper was in the mid 30’s out of 40 (around 80% score) and the average scores on the Reasoning Papers (Paper 2 and 3) were 7 and 10 out of 35 (around 20-30% score). This is telling. Children are not being exposed to enough problem solving challenges. As such, it’s hardly a surprise that children experience anxiety when faced with mathematical challenges.

 

It is no secret that a controlled level of anxiety in the classroom can push children out of their comfort zone and encourage greater learning steps. However, there will be a fine balance for teachers to strike which will mean children feel secure enough in their learning to take risks but also push their learning further.

Educational Idealism @Mroberts90Matt

Recently, as has been commented on, EduTwitter seems to have been rocked with graceless mud-slinging and overloaded accusations from both sides of the debate. The Michaela Academy has caused massive verbal rants, cruel insults (from both sides) and elongated Twitter conversations. Seriously, I actually spent 20 minutes reading through one of them, captivated at how…pointless…the debate was and then realised I had wasted 20 minutes of my life.
(By the way, I say pointless not because there was nothing to be debated – rather that hundreds of tweets were casted and nothing really changed, just a negative tone on my Twitter feed).

Despite this raging issue, which as I write this still is ongoing, there are issues in education which everyone seems to agree with. So why is everyone using their efforts to engage in discussions which are having no impact other than to cause divide and paint others in the negative light. It is clear that those within Michaela feel there has been a hate campaign and that others feel that their methods go against their personal views. I have my views, yet I am not going to comment on who and which side I am in agreement with – there’s enough practitioners doing that very well.

I want to focus on those issues which have popped up alongside the Michaela debate that are either ongoing or that are changing. Unfortunately, it seems that these issues that everyone agrees with are more difficult to overcome or never seem to have an easy answer. I call these ‘Educational Ideals’ because we all know that there must be a better way – it just seems that right now there isn’t a clear way forward. However, if all educators unite their efforts to these, then positive change will happen. I will list a few examples here:

  1. Ending the SATs Anxiety

Here I am not calling for an end to SATs. They are necessary. I personally feel that we can  keep schools accountable by measuring the progress of pupils. However it is the way that these tests and results are used that are the issue. High-stakes testing is causing a strain on schools, staff and children and this negative source will have an impact. We can agree that the anxiety caused by SATs is unsustainable – what can teachers do to raise their voices and end this anxiety?

2. Reducing the Ofsted Workload

Here I am not calling for an end to Ofsted. They are necessary. I personally feel that we can keep schools accountable by ensuring there is a good level standard of teaching and learning going on in schools and they are maintaining educational excellence with outstanding leadership. However it is the way that these inspections and visits are conducted and prepared for that is the issue. High-stakes monitoring is causing a strain on schools and staff and this negative source will have an impact. We can agree that the fear caused by Ofsted inspections is unsustainable – what can teachers do to raise their voices and end this fear?

Fortunately teachers have been heard on this matter. Ofsted, however this has been done, have heard the outcries and they are starting to make more proactive steps to try and reduce the workload created by their visits. Ofsted produced a document a couple of years ago which outlined myths which unfortunately a number of schools still haven’t taken into consideration: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-inspection-handbook-from-september-2015/ofsted-inspections-mythbusting

As recently as the 18th January, Sean Harford posted a blog outlining again some myths about safeguarding in Ofsted inspections to try and make expectations clear and consistent. https://educationinspection.blog.gov.uk/2017/01/18/keeping-children-safe-in-education-and-ofsteds-role/

Of course some schools may be reluctant to listen to these assurances by Ofsted themselves in case they receive an inspector who still expects something that has been debunked. That’s when we can refer to these documents from Ofsted. We must spread this to all schools so all staff can be relieved of unnecessary burdens.

3. Ending the Marking Madness

Here I am not calling for an end to marking (…or do I mean feedback – that’s a whole other debate). It is necessary. I personally feel that we must  keep children aware of their learning by feeding back effectively on the learning they have recorded. However it is the way that this marking is monitored and in what format it is expected that is the problem. High-volume marking (in amount and expectation) is causing a strain on schools and staff and this negative source will have an impact on well-being if not managed. We can agree that the fatigue caused by marking is unsustainable – what can teachers do to raise their voices and end this fatigue?

Again, this is something which has had a recent development! Ofsted – in the updated myth-busting document mentioned earlier – have made it clear that they have no specific expectation on the quantity of marking. They state:
“Ofsted recognises that marking and feedback to pupils, both written and oral, are important aspects of assessment. However, Ofsted does not expect to see any specific frequency, type or volume of marking and feedback; these are for the school to decide through its assessment policy. Marking and feedback should be consistent with that policy, which may cater for different subjects and different age groups of pupils in different ways, in order to be effective and efficient in promoting learning.

Perfect news right? The days of complex colour coding and dialogue between teacher and pupil written endlessly in books are gone right? Ofsted have done their part and made it clear what they do and don’t expect – but again, not all schools will know/take this on board for fear they will be inspected by an inspector that will expect it. As such, their marking policy may not be reducing teacher’s workloads. And because of the statement highlighted in bold (Marking and feedback should be consistent with that policy) whether you like it or not – if your school has a ridiculous marking policy, you will be expected by Ofsted to mark ridiculously!

So what is the answer? If your school is still implementing ineffective, workload-inducing marking policies then speak out. Say something to the SLT, show the Ofsted document and present a new strategy that will still fit in Ofsted guidelines but reduce workload.

Use our Teacher Voice

As educationalists we can make these ideals happen – but instead of throwing comments and causing divides, we must raise our voices on what really matters. Positive change is happening – let’s shout about it so ALL hear this and prevent any negative changes in the future.

The Stressing Abominable Tests or The Shameful Aggrandisation of Tests? by @Mroberts90Matt

It’s January. That means the start of crazy season for Year 6. Incredible targets never before seen in the children’s lives are set, staff give up their mornings for booster sessions (not because they’ve been asked to but just because they want the children/school/performance management to get the results required) and children are suddenly hit with a larger amount of testing. All those who have worked around Year 6 know this feeling. However, as this circumstance impacts a large sphere of influence (other teachers, parents, governors, governments and so on) it creates a wide array of opinions.

I think there is one clear consensus – the current climate of testing in the Education System in England is not healthy. Children, teachers and schools are under strain to perform. It is not necessarily the expectation that is too high, but the emphasis placed on these results that causes extreme pressure. As I was looking at this issue I came across two excellent blog posts which identified contrasting views but both gave points which I fully agreed with. I would encourage you to have a look at them:

https://debrakiddmum.wordpress.com/2016/04/20/whose-child-is-it-anyway/

This post written by well-known Debra Kidd (who I had the pleasure of being taught by at University) and it hit home with me. She was always inspirational in her sessions and it was at the time I was being taught by her that she decided to leave the University and go back into teaching.

I have a 4 year old son. He loves dinosaurs, cars, Paw Patrol and playing with his parents and his little sister. He loves being read to and is starting to read letters and sounds as well as simple high frequency words (he doesn’t enjoy that quite as much though). Basically he is a typical 4 year old boy. However, in a year and a few months he will be sitting his first ‘test’. He will be tested on his ability to decode and read phonic letters and sounds. Now whilst I know this is not like the SATs and less emphasis may be placed on it, it represents the beginning of a school career of testing.

She states: “The new tests are so demanding and the results from last year so unreliable that schools are in a blind panic about not meeting the floor target. They are concerned that poor data will lead to a poor Ofsted inspection. They are right to be worried. This is the government that declared they wanted all pupils to be above average, demonstrating a poorer understanding of mathematics than they expect of their 11 year olds.”

I agree that schools are in a panic and that they are trying to shift their results in assessments that are of a higher standard so they reach high expectations. Due to schools being deemed as ‘requiring improvement’ if their pupils only achieve expected progress (wow, I would hate for my child to be in those schools that provide the progress that the government expects, because that are requiring improvement!) they are in a frenzy to push results up. Ofsted are changing their ways to put less of an impact of their judgements on hour long lesson obervations, but because of this they are relying more on data. We have heard the stories of inspections where the watchdog have walked in already with a judgement in their mind after having received a RaiseOnline analysis, and the school has to prove them wrong. I heard of a school where the inspector came in, did their findings, then said that the school was requires improvement. When asked for the points to improve on, they did not have any!! All from the results of these high-stakes tests.

Debra calls for parents to stand up and make their voice heard. A sticking point with some teachers on Twitter was the assumption that Debra suggests that parents should take their children out of the SATs pressure. Firstly, she does not suggest this – in fact she clearly states that she is not saying this: “That’s not to say we should all boycott – that’s a matter of personal choice, made between each parent and each child.”  I agree that changes need to be made. Hopefully parents can work together to make their voices heard. Unfortunately, I work with some parents that probably aren’t even aware their children are sitting tests this year (despite discussing it at Parents Evening with them). And this is where the issue arises – across the nation there will be parents who recognise the need for change but there will be a greater number who will be unaware of this issue. Can the current minority make their voice heard enough? Hopefully…

Then I came across this post by The Quirky Teacher:

https://thequirkyteacher.wordpress.com/2017/01/14/the-trouble-with-sats/

Again, several points were made in this well-written article, which was a direct response to Debra Kidd’s post. Out of the points that were made, two stood out to me.

The first was that the SATs were not the problem. Again, another point I can agree with. Schools must be accountable to the part they play in educating our children. If that performance was not measured then progress will slow. I hate having my performance monitored as much as anyone else but it is necessary in order to make sure children are making the progress required. As a result, some schools feel that they need to motivate children by saying these results will have an impact on their secondary school experience. This is plain lying. The children will be tested when they enter secondary school as the results they come up with are not always an accurate measure anyway. For example, I taught a child in 2014-15 who was not achieving more than 10/50 in the Old Curriculum Reading Test in March (in other words, just lower than a 3c). He left our school with a Level 4. I to this day do not know how that child pulled it off but I know that when he walked into that secondary school with that level attributed to him they would have wondered what happened in the Summer of 2015 between schools.

Speaking of that child walking into the secondary school with that level, it was stated with the introduction of the SATs that the system was simply there to measure the schools ability to educate and progress children’s learning. That actually should still be the case. But schools under pressure, parents wanting children to succeed and children being trained into this exam culture influence change the landscape of the purpose of the SATs. This was probably a naïve statement from the government at the time, but it is not a problem with the SATs themselves, it is a problem of those involved in the SATs.

The second point made was that parents must bear the brunt of the problems that have arisen. The point made is that parents are allowing their children to slack in their educational progress due to today’s culture of YouTube, quick meals and previous progressive education. Whilst to a point I agree with this notion, there is a comment I disagree with.

“…there was a time in the not-so-distant past when children mostly achieved these standards without too much fuss.”

Yes the standards are not astronomical. They are attainable and challenging and I agree with this. However, these standards have indeed been raised. If a child taught under the Old Curriculum for the past 7 years sat the New Curriculum assessments then they would struggle a lot more. This can clearly be seen in the number of children meeting the expected standard in Reading, Writing and Maths in 2014-15 compared to 2015-16 nationally. Why is this? The standards have changed.

However, I am not saying that the standards that have been raised to where they shouldn’t have been. And yes, as a general rule, children today do not have the same opportunities for learning at home then they did previously. This certainly is not the case for all but for most. Being a parent myself I know as much as any how difficult it can be to keep children focused on their learning and make sure they make as much progress as they can.

Simply put, I agree with both of these great educators in their points of view to a point. However, I think there is something we can all agree with – the current KS2 Assessments are not completely fit for purpose due to the impact their results can have for schools, not the fact we have tests or with the tests themselves.

Lessons from #SchoolSwap by @Mroberts90Matt

So I have just watched BBC’s School Swap: Korea Style and of course there was a lot to pick out from it. I think the report was decent – pretty obvious conclusions were made: South Korea could do with giving their students a break (children helplessly dropping off to sleep, suicide rates in 10-30 year olds and so on) and Wales (but let’s be honest, the UK) could do with toughening up their learners to build more stamina in their education. The wrapping up of the report I felt was the most disappointing – yes ok, we need to learn from South Korea, so what are those things? Well, here are some things that I picked up:

1: Respect of the authority of the teacher
This is an issue in the schools across the UK. Admittedly there is more of an issue generally in secondary education, however it is becoming a more widespread in primary education also. In fact:

A survey for the ATL teachers’ union of 1,250 teachers across England, Wales and Northern Ireland reports that:

  • 40% of teachers have experienced at least one incidence of violence from pupils in the past year.
  • Of those, 77% said they had been pushed, and around half were kicked or had an object thrown at them.
  • 90% had dealt with challenging behaviour, such as swearing or shouting, in the past year.
  • 45% feel that pupil behaviour has worsened over the past two years

These are concerning figures. Change has to occur. In the programme it was clear the children in Korea had the upmost respect for their teachers. This was evident in the way they engaged with the lessons (which, incidentally, if there had been bad behaviour present would have been branded as ‘boring and led to the poor behaviour’) and the celebrity status of the shown teacher (although I thought that was bizarre).Whilst I am sure that in the whole country of South Korea there are some schools with behaviour issues, it seems the general consensus is one of the utmost respect for the authority of the teacher. This has a major impact on learning as behaviour will generally improve as respect for the teacher heightens. Of course, not all behaviour issues will be eliminated but it will go a long way. 

2: Crack down on behaviour

If three teenagers go to another country and say that they think rules should be enforced better back home in their education system, we all need to sit up and listen. However, something isn’t right…our country knows this. The DfE published a document in January 2016 concerning behaviour. In this document it says:

“When poor behaviour is identified, sanctions should be implemented consistently and fairly in line with the behaviour policy.”

Behaviour is identified in our government’s policies and is set as a clear expectation within all schools. So why the issue? I won’t pretend to understand why – maybe it links to the previous point on respect, maybe it is the attitude of the general population of parents, maybe it’s a lack in consistency in the managing of behaviour. For whatever reason, behaviour is an issue in UK schools. Despite the number of schools receiving Good or Outstanding in their ‘Behaviour’ category in Ofsted reports, it is something that must improve if the UK is to progress in it’s learning generally.

3: After-school learning

In Primary education we can look to most schools and see a lot of after-school activity. What is the majority of them? Speaking from my personal experience Sports and the Arts. It is rare you see a Maths Club (although it does happen). In South Korea they have ‘hagwons’ where children go after school and engage in more focused learning. This would be positive. What are the problems? Money. Who will provide, where will the funding come from in an already stretched budget. Prevalent culture. How many are really going to accept that without a problem?

These are a few things picked out – however somethings really stood out that highlighted some areas that we are doing…better in.

Broad and Balanced Curriculum

Now – I know that in our education system it is sometimes difficult (particularly being a Year 6 teacher) to offer a broad and balanced curriculum – although we do just about manage it! There is a reason why Team GB have been progressively getting better and better at the Olympics for example. We are showing some ability to raise sporting and creative talent. Not that I am saying we are the best in the world – but we are excelling further than South Korea are.

Wellbeing (to some degree)

Again, this is not a statement saying that in the UK we produce able learners who have good wellbeing. There are still things to work on, particularly in physical fitness across the general population. However, the segment in the program about young suicide rates in South Korea was an eye-opener. We still have some way to go, however I am pleased to know that my children will have the opportunity to enjoy some childhood (…maybe until they sit the GPS Test in Year 2)…

References:

Able Training (2016): http://www.able-training.co.uk/2016/01/challenging-behaviour-and-aggression-in-schools/

How I ‘mark’ regularly but I’m not a marking martyr 

Couldn’t agree more. I use a code system where I assign a code to a certain comment or identifying of a misconception or a challenge. The chn write down the comments and do the challenge in purple pen. Means they actually take in the comments more if they write them and interact with feedback rather than letting it wash over them.

missdcoxblog

In case you’re interested, this is what I think and what I do.

Thoughts on where I think some schools/leaders/teachers go wrong:

  • Thinking more writing = more learning.
  • Every lesson, students must write X amount.
  • A teacher needs to write on a piece of work
  • ‘Teaching’ lessons to cover content is more important than reflecting, redrafting and improving on prior work/learning
  • Every piece of student writing has to be marked in the same way to the same depth
  • All student work (including homework) must result in some sort of recordable result
  • Conflating marking with assessment/reading work/feedback
  • Having the same policy for all subjects including frequency and methods
  • Believing the colour of pens matter beyond being different colours

My classes

To give some context I teach 18 classes. 3 are GCSE groups, the rest are core RE with lessons ranging from 1-3 times a fortnight. They use 3 different formats for…

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