Tag Archives: games

Times Tables Rock Stars by @Mroberts90Matt

It’s been a few years now that a mandatory times tables assessment as been banded about. Snap general elections, changes in Education Secretaries and basically the fact that other more important things had to be sorted meant that this took a while to come into force. However, the time has come and we have an answer. From the 2019-2020 academic year, every Year 4 child across the country will undertake a mandatory, online assessment of their times tables.​​​​​​ Whether this is required or not is another debate – however I am personally pleased with the way in which the format and timing of the assessment was decided – namely through an open online consultation for education professionals. It’s a shame that just under a thousand teachers responded (if we want decision-makers in education to listen to teaching staff then we need to take the chance to have our voice heard) but it is still a positive step I feel.

One thing that this announcement has done for me as a new Maths Coordinator is take action – I suppose if that’s the case for others then the new times tables assessment may already be successful?…

Anyway, as a school we decided to improve our mastery of our children’s times tables by investing in Times Tables Rock Stars. And was it worth every penny! What I will aim to do here is explain how we have trialled this programme in my Year 6 class, how the school is buzzing about it and the impact we are already seeing from our two-prong approach:

Paper Challenges

One feature of TTRS is the worksheet challenges they offer. In the past our school would do times tables mental starters every now and then, followed by a main times tables challenge at the end of the week. These would take the form of times tables grids with randomised numbers. Older year groups would take on a big grid and the younger year groups some smaller ones. However, we wanted to integrate times tables challenges more throughout the week and drive more purpose into the challenges. Times Tables Rock Stars does this very effectively with a number of banks of challenges. Teachers can personalise these schedules of challenges to certain times tables, whether they do 3, 4 or 5 challenges a week and whether they include division.

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All challenges within these banks give the children three minutes to complete sixty questions. The children can then add up their scores and time over the entire week of challenges. This is where the magic really begins to happen…

There is a place on the website where you can fairly easily input this data onto the website. When each child’s score is put into the week (we do this on a Friday) the children can see their individual rock speed. They take great delight in trying to reach our target speed and trying to be the best class in the school (more on that in a minute). You can then see your classes progress on the website also:

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(Ignore week 5 – we have not yet added our fastest group’s time to the class average)

What we have done with this as a school is created a Weekly Times Tables Trophy and the class that does the best with their target speed wins this. This is calculated by the number of children who reach the target time for that class divided by the number of children. Of course, the target time is differentiated by year group and class as can be seen here:

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We have done this twice now and something very interesting has happened. Because the school challenge is far more fair as each class teacher is using their professional judgement to focus their times table challenges on what their class needs and the target speed is differentiated, the award is much more open. And who doesn’t love filling in a quick times tables challenge whilst listening to Living On a Prayer or We Built This City on Rock and Roll? 😉

However, this is not even the most exciting part of using Times Tables Rock Stars…

Online Challenges

On the website there are four engaging and exciting modes to play:

Festival – This mode allows all children across the world to play one minute challenges against each other with random times tables up to 12×12. This is the default mode that appears but must be used with care for younger children as it does include all times tables.
Studio – This is a single player mode that again includes all 12x tables. However, this is a particularly important mode. It allows you (once you’ve completed a minimum of 10 games) to set an online rock speed which you can compete against others in your school on a leaderboard to get the best rock speed. This really brings in a competitive edge to the online version and our children love looking at our class leaderboard in our room to see who’s moved up! You can even compare average rock speeds with other local schools! A must-use method!
Garage – Another vital mode. This is a single player mode where the children receive 10 coins for each correct answer (whereas the other modes reward a correct answer with only once coin). This encourages more children to try this mode which is important as it is the main mode where the teacher can set the times tables questioned. There are even 5 groups that you can put the children in and differentiate the questions that they will receive. This is what I would encourage most younger year groups to use before they have a firmer grasp on all times tables.
Rock Arena – Basically the same as the Garage but it is a multiplayer version for just the children in your class to compete against each other (with their differentiated tables). A good mode to use if you’re going online as a class.

We encourage our children across school to go on the website at home and we have purchased the app add-on which allows them to access it on our school iPads and most devices at home. We incentivise it using ‘Most Improved’ awards and ‘Highest Earner’ awards which are posted in each classroom and can be easily downloaded off the resource-rich website.

Impact

One half-term is usually too soon to note significant impacts on times table progress. However, two pieces of evidence seem to indicate with my two Year 6 groups that this two prong approach using Times Tables Rock Stars is already making a difference.

First, the percentage calculated in both our higher ability and lower ability maths sets has steadily increased each week. This is not a generalisation. I have recorded the percentage each week and (apart from one week right at the start for both groups) each group’s percentage of children reaching their target speed has increased steadily! Evidence that the paper challenges have had an impact in the Year 6 trial!

Secondly, within Year 6 there is a difference between the two classes. One class have a 0.75 quicker average rock speed than the other. This is might not sound like a lot but it is significant. Interestingly this gap has slightly increased over time. What is the difference between the two? The class with more minutes played online on Times Tables Rock Stars are the class with the fastest average speed which has steadily gained a faster speed than the other.

I would encourage all schools to seriously take this programme on. Not only will it help prepare their current Year 2s and future children for the new times tables assessments (which by the way will be typed online, which Times Tables Rock Stars will also prepare them for) but it will help the children gain a quicker ability on the recall of their times tables. Also, it is very affordably priced in a world where schools have to make more and more cuts.

Right – off I go to try and overtake that pesky Year 6 who has once again beaten my rock speed – this time with a 0.77 answers per second!

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Spending Sport Premium by @Mroberts90Matt

Once again, a recent discussion on #PrimaryRocks has inspired me to write this post! There was a #PrimaryRocks focused on PE and the question came up about the best way to spend Sport Premium. Now, Twitter is great for CPD and making connections but there was no way I could put into 140 characters, or even a handful of 140 characters, how to effectively spend Sport Premium. However, it is vital that this topic is communicated effectively as a lot of resources are put into PE Lead’s hands.

Each school in the UK (actually, I don’t know if it’s both Primary and Secondary, I presume both) receive an allotted amount of money solely for the purpose on developing a ‘legacy’ of PE and Sport. It’s an important word that – legacy – not ‘just providing the minimum within the curriculum’. A legacy of sport. This funding is initially provided from the London Olympic 2012 Legacy and as such, it should be used in a way to push school level sport beyond where it is now.

The problem is, unless they are part of a local sports partnership, many PE and Sports coordinators are not given direction on how to spend this valuable pot of resources. Interestingly, when asked what was the main barrier to the progress of PE in school, I did not notice a single #PrimaryRocker say that a lack of resources was an issue whereas if you asked, say, Science coordinators or Computing coordinators that same question – they may well point to a lack of resources or funding as a key issue. On top of this, the sugar tax is now going to double the provision for the Sport Premium funding from next academic year. Whether schools will actually get ‘double’ their amount or just an increase is not known yet (and probably will not be known until after 8 June) but one thing is clear: Sport Premium is still a priority. With schools being expected (by Ofsted) to publish their Sport Premium spending and the impact of it, it is even more important than ever to know how to effectively spend this money.

Outcomes
I feel a need to clarify why I feel qualified to share how we spent our Sport Premium in my first year as a PE Coordinator. I realised that this was a major problem for a number of PE Coordinators, both on Twitter and a couple of PE coordinators in local schools near me feel the same.

The year before I was appointed PE Coordinator, my school were just about achieving Bronze in the School Games Mark (a national award for school PE and Sport) and had only one or two members of staff leading extra-curricular clubs. Most classes were holding one hour of PE (led by the school coach – who is incredible) and not really any intra-school competitions excluding a Sports Day.

After a year of Sport Premium spending in the following manner (or philosophy), we led the school to Gold in the School Games Mark and we were named ‘School of the Year’ for Sport in the Local Authority by our Sports Partnership. Now, of course many other things were to do with this: a wonderfully engaging staff, a lot of children with enthusiastic potential, great location in Old Trafford, Manchester, an inspiring Head and willing SLT and so on. Also, not all the things I will list by be possible in your particular school, which is why I break this down into ‘stages’ or ‘principles’ which if followed will have an impact on school PE and Sport in your school.
Also, I will not lay out detail in spending or my actual school, but all suggestions listed came to just under the amount of the Sport Premium.

Stage 1 – Energise, Enthuse and Educate Staff
Any attempt to make a school-wide shift in ethos towards PE and Sport must be backed by the staff. If they are not engaged, one person will not achieve a lot. Even if that person is dedicated, they will eventually be swamped by the demands to make inspirational, effective change alone in the wide world of Sport.

As such, the first chunk of our Sport Premium was allocated to engage the staff. We purchased a package from our local authority sports provider which did a number of things. First it provided a year’s free membership to the gym for each contracted member of staff. There was a tangible excitement about this instantly. Staff were signing up and taking up the great offer. They were opening up to the idea of sport and PE.

Along with the free gym, staff were given a 2 hour curriculum slot. This was not to be a long term replacement. Each Year Group (from Year 1-6) would get this slot for one half term only and when their class was taken, the class teacher would be expected to observe. Giving staff professional development in PE is important but often the issues are 1. Time and 2. Tailoring to each staff members needs (e.g. one staff member may be uncertain about teaching Gymnastics whereas the other is less confident at teaching a certain sport). As such, I gave staff the opportunity to let me know what area of the PE Curriculum they were less happy teaching as they did not have the sufficient knowledge and I had the external agency would deliver this. Quality control was important and so I closely monitored the satisfaction of this with the teachers involved to begin with. Everything went well and the teachers expressed they found it useful.

Something else that was done which I think is quite unique that we used our Sport Premium for was the purchase of special kits for competitions. Also, the SLT and any staff who would be happy to run a club received their own, monogrammed version of the school sports kit.

As the mentioned expenditures developed, something very interesting happened. The year before there had been only one staff member providing extra-curricular sport activity (the PE specialist). Since the implementation of this Stage 1, there have been a total of over 11 different members of staff who have led at least a half term’s worth of extra-curricular clubs, and the most recent ones only just started this half term so it is still ongoing. The spirit of sport has caught hold in the staff’s hearts. This has been partly down to the wise way our Head began spending the Sport Premium but also through his enthusiasm for sport and PE also.

Stage 2 – Provide and Participate in Wider Opportunities

The groundwork had been laid. Sport began to spread through every year group. The vital focus of Stage 2 was to provide chances for children in our school to see the bigger picture – to look outside the walls of our own school. We had to provide opportunities to compete with other schools.

The easiest way to do this was to buy into our local School Sports Partnership. This was an indispensable use of our Sport Premium. They provided CPD for myself as the PE Coordinator, keeping me up to date on any changes in PE leadership but also making more CPD available for staff in our school. Along with this, they organised, led and promoted a vast variety of sporting competitions. All we had to do was come along. We have seen great success in applying to compete with other schools. However, being part of this partnership does not stop there. Our school has also been privileged to hold a CPD event and a multi-skills festival for other schools in the area. Due to our working partnership with the organisation, we also had a visit from Sue Smith (ex-England International Football Player) as well as presenting to VIPs at the Greater Manchester Games. This has provided a great sense of sporting pride in the school and again, engaged more children in taking part in healthy activities.

Stage 3 – Provide world-class Club Links

Once we laid these foundations in the school and with other schools, we used the remaining batch of Sport Premium funding to make partnerships with a number of external clubs. Some required cost but in the first year we made links with Manchester United, Lancashire County Cricket Club, Sale Sharks, a local Table Tennis club, Trafford Leisure and others. Being in Manchester we are fortunate to have these clubs with world-class facilities which we have been fortunate enough to utilise. However, making these links can be done anywhere. Doing this will bring in professional coaching additional to the PE curriculum and clubs your school are offering, other events such as Roadshows and Open Days at the grounds themselves and chances to be involved in actual sporting events at the club.

Two examples: a selection of our children (our School Sports Organising Crew – SSOC – who also received their own special kits by the way) were invited to watch numerous football matches at Manchester United. Amazingly so, some of our children were also invited to be the guard of honour at the England vs Pakistan Test match at the LCCC ground in July last year (as well as our staff being invited to watch the match afterwards). These and more examples have again promoted the importance and excitement of sport.

How you implement these three stages will be different for the different locations of schools. However, following this pattern of stages has provided a great culture of sport and enthusiasm around physical activity to the point where we are seeing even more improvement in all areas.

How have you spent your Sport Premium? Have there been lasting benefits? Please do share!

Code Kingdoms

Just a quick one to share a resource I’ve just come across.

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This very attractive and engaging website (with an iOS app which I haven’t looked at yet) is a very addictive game, I was hooked straight away. If involves a little animal (which you choose) going around saving ducks and defeating ‘glitches’. Simple yet effective with easy controls. However there’s more to this than meets the eye and takes to it a whole new level.

 

The game introduces children to computational thinking. In the game itself you need to use some ducks to assist you and you move these ducks by selecting the correct code. Not only that but there is a level editor, which the game’s main purpose, which allows you to create your own worlds and then share them with other players. It will require some input on basic computing language, but it’s quite easy to pick up. It’s definitely one to have a look at (but set yourself a time limit)!

http://codekingdoms.com/