Tag Archives: leadership

Teamship

Recently I have been lent a book by Alastair Campbell called ‘Winners’. It basically breaks down different winners in history and the characteristics that they have. That’s a very simplified version of what this great book covers. Of course, different winners have different styles but it identifies winning strategies which can be applied to a number of different contexts, including in education.

He refers to Teamship and how if leaders can build a team goal or vision which all team members are dedicated to, no matter their role, then there will be success. One example he gave was a pit stop crew. A race can be won or lost in the pit stop. If the pit stop crew lose a fraction of a second in changing a tyre or making a slight modification, then it can throw the entire race for the team. As such, a clear structure and set roles are vital in this team. They have a clear objective – complete your task in the quickest time possible – win the race. The same could be said in a school team. No matter the roles or responsibilities of each team member, if they have the same vision (maybe provide the best education experience possible) and fulfil their roles for that common goal then that team can succeed.
Out of interest, I googled the quickest ever recorded pit stop that Alastair Campbell made reference to. 1.9 seconds! You have to watch extremely carefully to see that they actually do something to the car! Watch it here:

Alastair Campbell also makes reference to another experience which I had heard before but is excellent on this topic. It is also debated whether this story is true or not but it teaches a valuable lesson. Reportedly, John F Kennedy visited NASA on a regular basis during the race to the moon. They were working against other countries to be the first to do so. The intensity of this race was highly pressurised. During one trip he came across a cleaner, and asked him what his job at NASA was. The cleaner replied “My Job is to put a man on the moon, Sir.”

We can learn a lot from this response. Clearly this man was not literally engineering a rocket ship to take a man to the moon. However, he had caught the vision. He knew he was art of a great organisation that had this significant goal. He knew he was part of the organisation. He knew he had an important job – to make the working environment in this organisation clean so the people working there could complete their roles efficiently and comfortably. Teamship is about recognising the goal and get the team there.

Cleaner in NASA

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What Makes Effective CPD by @Mrobert90Matt

I am so appreciative of the senior leadership of my school. They have given me the opportunity to undertake a course of study on a NPQML course. Recently I began a Leading and Developing Staff module where I have been questioning my practice around how to support those I have responsibility for so they can develop in their roles.

One focus in particular was the use of CPD and how is it made more effective. I have been teaching for 2 years and, like many of you, I have seen world-class inspiration and extremely uncomfortable lectures. It may seem obvious to state but the better the CPD a teaching team has then teaching and learning will improve. In fact Stoll, Harris and Handscomb (2012) affirmed “It seems obvious to state that great professional development is fundamental to great pedagogy.”

However, great CPD does not just entertain, engage or keep a teaching staff busy on other things. The whole purpose of continuous professional development must be to enact change. In the few trainings I have delivered one of the main things I try to do is leave an action or a challenge for the participants because otherwise, what would the point be? Bubb & Earley, (2007:4) identify how key getting staff to take on questioning and changing of practice when they said “…an ongoing process encompassing all formal and informal learning experiences that enable all staff in schools, individually and with others, to think about what they are doing, enhance their knowledge and skills and improve ways of working so that pupil learning and wellbeing are enhanced as a result… creating opportunities for adult learning, ultimately for the purpose of enhancing the quality of education in the classroom.” So, effective professional development must encourage staff to enhance knowledge and skills which will then have an impact on all areas in the classroom.

In order to ensure I am able to provide effective continuous professional development, I have researched into key characteristics of effective professional development and here is a list which may be useful:

1. Effective professional development starts with the end in mind
I have found this is most effective for a whole school. When the staff meeting dates and agendas are set terms in advance, it allows school leaders to strategically plan for the optimal times for each CPD session. The best CPD strategic planning takes busy times in the year to account (such as Parents Evenings, report deadline, assessment deadlines etc) and plans the more urgent or potentially powerful objectives away from those times. Planning with the end in mind.

2. Effective professional development challenges thinking as part of changing practice.
As mentioned before, this has to be present in my opinion. If the process of challenging thinking is not present, then the teacher’s may have well just marked there never-ending piles of books in that time. Whilst it is partly the teacher’s responsibility to take on the challenge to open their minds and accept the challenge to change, the provider of the CPD must be enticing and engaging enough to persuade the teachers (those open to challenging their practice and those not so open) to challenge their own thinking.

3. Effective professional development is based on the assessment of individual and school needs.
The most effective CPD is based on school development points. This is made even more effective as the staff are involved in at least knowing what those development points are because they then know it is something of importance for the development of the school.

4. Effective professional development involves connecting work-based learning and external expertise.
I had to learn what this was initially. Simply, work-based learning is defined as opportunities to learn in-school, by shadowing, interning or taking small-scale project leadership. Therefore, effective CPD uses both in-school training and external speakers and expertise. This blend of effective relationship and knowledge building between staff and from the best experts creates a vibrant, exciting professional development timetable. I think the best CPD on its own are chances staff have to share ideas and things that have worked well but that does not mean school’s should not invest in expertise – but preferably from deliverers who are not out of touch from the rigour and demands of today’s classroom teachers.

5. Effective professional learning opportunities are varied, rich and sustainable.
As teachers we are expected to make learning varied, rich and sustainable in our classrooms. We are scrutinised, supported and expected as part of our job role to enthuse our learner To do this, and then go on a Tuesday afternoon to a CPD session planned by the strategic leaders of our school that does and is the opposite I can imagine seems demoralising, time-wasting and hypocritical. Fortunately I am not in a school like that – I look forward to our CPD sessions and that is because the opportunities are rich. One week we have a hands-on Computing input by our passionate Computing lead, then a paradigm-shifting session on Whole Class Guided Reading by our English Lead and then a serious but equally important session on Safeguarding lead by the Head. All of this is shared on our school website to the staff, parents and even pupils so all know that we are engaged in valuable and varied CPD.

6. Effective professional development uses action research and enquiry as key tools.
In presenting CPD, it is important to include research. This gives the focus of the professional development more authority and is therefore more likely to have an impact on the teacher’s practice. As an example, when I was planning my project for my NPQML, I located a Case Study which confirmed that in at least 6 other educational settings, the initiative I wanted to implement had an impact. When I was able to share this with the SLT and later the teaching staff, I felt more confident that this would work and they seemed to take even more notice, being influenced by the research behind the approach which they could then see a model on how to apply.
 

7. Effective professional development is strongly enhanced through collaborative learning and joint practice development.
#PrimaryRocks – nuff said! Perfect embodiment of this point.

8. Effective professional development is enhanced by creating professional learning communities within and between schools.
Whilst I have my views on schools becoming multi-trust academies, there is a massive benefit that cannot be ignored. Schools within an academy trust are even more likely to share good practice because they have a vested interest in the academy chain. Yes this should happen within the Local Authority system but from what I’ve seen, in a world where pressure is being ever placed on individual schools to perform, this causes most schools to withdraw in to focus on pushing their performance higher, with little time remaining to share excellent practice.

9. Effective professional development requires leadership to create the necessary conditions.
This is key. Without a visionary leadership, devoted to the development of their staff, then quality CPD will not be high on the agenda in a busy school. I could be wrong in saying this but the leadership in a school should have staff as the priority, not the children. The reason I suggest this thought is that once the staff are well-provided for by the leadership in the school, the staff then make the children their absolute prority and as they are the ones leading the front line in quality teaching and learning, this will be pivotal.

What are your thoughts? Do you agree with this list or would you question something? Would you add anything?

Spending Sport Premium by @Mroberts90Matt

Once again, a recent discussion on #PrimaryRocks has inspired me to write this post! There was a #PrimaryRocks focused on PE and the question came up about the best way to spend Sport Premium. Now, Twitter is great for CPD and making connections but there was no way I could put into 140 characters, or even a handful of 140 characters, how to effectively spend Sport Premium. However, it is vital that this topic is communicated effectively as a lot of resources are put into PE Lead’s hands.

Each school in the UK (actually, I don’t know if it’s both Primary and Secondary, I presume both) receive an allotted amount of money solely for the purpose on developing a ‘legacy’ of PE and Sport. It’s an important word that – legacy – not ‘just providing the minimum within the curriculum’. A legacy of sport. This funding is initially provided from the London Olympic 2012 Legacy and as such, it should be used in a way to push school level sport beyond where it is now.

The problem is, unless they are part of a local sports partnership, many PE and Sports coordinators are not given direction on how to spend this valuable pot of resources. Interestingly, when asked what was the main barrier to the progress of PE in school, I did not notice a single #PrimaryRocker say that a lack of resources was an issue whereas if you asked, say, Science coordinators or Computing coordinators that same question – they may well point to a lack of resources or funding as a key issue. On top of this, the sugar tax is now going to double the provision for the Sport Premium funding from next academic year. Whether schools will actually get ‘double’ their amount or just an increase is not known yet (and probably will not be known until after 8 June) but one thing is clear: Sport Premium is still a priority. With schools being expected (by Ofsted) to publish their Sport Premium spending and the impact of it, it is even more important than ever to know how to effectively spend this money.

Outcomes
I feel a need to clarify why I feel qualified to share how we spent our Sport Premium in my first year as a PE Coordinator. I realised that this was a major problem for a number of PE Coordinators, both on Twitter and a couple of PE coordinators in local schools near me feel the same.

The year before I was appointed PE Coordinator, my school were just about achieving Bronze in the School Games Mark (a national award for school PE and Sport) and had only one or two members of staff leading extra-curricular clubs. Most classes were holding one hour of PE (led by the school coach – who is incredible) and not really any intra-school competitions excluding a Sports Day.

After a year of Sport Premium spending in the following manner (or philosophy), we led the school to Gold in the School Games Mark and we were named ‘School of the Year’ for Sport in the Local Authority by our Sports Partnership. Now, of course many other things were to do with this: a wonderfully engaging staff, a lot of children with enthusiastic potential, great location in Old Trafford, Manchester, an inspiring Head and willing SLT and so on. Also, not all the things I will list by be possible in your particular school, which is why I break this down into ‘stages’ or ‘principles’ which if followed will have an impact on school PE and Sport in your school.
Also, I will not lay out detail in spending or my actual school, but all suggestions listed came to just under the amount of the Sport Premium.

Stage 1 – Energise, Enthuse and Educate Staff
Any attempt to make a school-wide shift in ethos towards PE and Sport must be backed by the staff. If they are not engaged, one person will not achieve a lot. Even if that person is dedicated, they will eventually be swamped by the demands to make inspirational, effective change alone in the wide world of Sport.

As such, the first chunk of our Sport Premium was allocated to engage the staff. We purchased a package from our local authority sports provider which did a number of things. First it provided a year’s free membership to the gym for each contracted member of staff. There was a tangible excitement about this instantly. Staff were signing up and taking up the great offer. They were opening up to the idea of sport and PE.

Along with the free gym, staff were given a 2 hour curriculum slot. This was not to be a long term replacement. Each Year Group (from Year 1-6) would get this slot for one half term only and when their class was taken, the class teacher would be expected to observe. Giving staff professional development in PE is important but often the issues are 1. Time and 2. Tailoring to each staff members needs (e.g. one staff member may be uncertain about teaching Gymnastics whereas the other is less confident at teaching a certain sport). As such, I gave staff the opportunity to let me know what area of the PE Curriculum they were less happy teaching as they did not have the sufficient knowledge and I had the external agency would deliver this. Quality control was important and so I closely monitored the satisfaction of this with the teachers involved to begin with. Everything went well and the teachers expressed they found it useful.

Something else that was done which I think is quite unique that we used our Sport Premium for was the purchase of special kits for competitions. Also, the SLT and any staff who would be happy to run a club received their own, monogrammed version of the school sports kit.

As the mentioned expenditures developed, something very interesting happened. The year before there had been only one staff member providing extra-curricular sport activity (the PE specialist). Since the implementation of this Stage 1, there have been a total of over 11 different members of staff who have led at least a half term’s worth of extra-curricular clubs, and the most recent ones only just started this half term so it is still ongoing. The spirit of sport has caught hold in the staff’s hearts. This has been partly down to the wise way our Head began spending the Sport Premium but also through his enthusiasm for sport and PE also.

Stage 2 – Provide and Participate in Wider Opportunities

The groundwork had been laid. Sport began to spread through every year group. The vital focus of Stage 2 was to provide chances for children in our school to see the bigger picture – to look outside the walls of our own school. We had to provide opportunities to compete with other schools.

The easiest way to do this was to buy into our local School Sports Partnership. This was an indispensable use of our Sport Premium. They provided CPD for myself as the PE Coordinator, keeping me up to date on any changes in PE leadership but also making more CPD available for staff in our school. Along with this, they organised, led and promoted a vast variety of sporting competitions. All we had to do was come along. We have seen great success in applying to compete with other schools. However, being part of this partnership does not stop there. Our school has also been privileged to hold a CPD event and a multi-skills festival for other schools in the area. Due to our working partnership with the organisation, we also had a visit from Sue Smith (ex-England International Football Player) as well as presenting to VIPs at the Greater Manchester Games. This has provided a great sense of sporting pride in the school and again, engaged more children in taking part in healthy activities.

Stage 3 – Provide world-class Club Links

Once we laid these foundations in the school and with other schools, we used the remaining batch of Sport Premium funding to make partnerships with a number of external clubs. Some required cost but in the first year we made links with Manchester United, Lancashire County Cricket Club, Sale Sharks, a local Table Tennis club, Trafford Leisure and others. Being in Manchester we are fortunate to have these clubs with world-class facilities which we have been fortunate enough to utilise. However, making these links can be done anywhere. Doing this will bring in professional coaching additional to the PE curriculum and clubs your school are offering, other events such as Roadshows and Open Days at the grounds themselves and chances to be involved in actual sporting events at the club.

Two examples: a selection of our children (our School Sports Organising Crew – SSOC – who also received their own special kits by the way) were invited to watch numerous football matches at Manchester United. Amazingly so, some of our children were also invited to be the guard of honour at the England vs Pakistan Test match at the LCCC ground in July last year (as well as our staff being invited to watch the match afterwards). These and more examples have again promoted the importance and excitement of sport.

How you implement these three stages will be different for the different locations of schools. However, following this pattern of stages has provided a great culture of sport and enthusiasm around physical activity to the point where we are seeing even more improvement in all areas.

How have you spent your Sport Premium? Have there been lasting benefits? Please do share!

Bennett’s Behaviour Brilliance (and #PrimaryRocksLive) by @Mroberts90Matt

On Friday, a new publication was made available on the DfE website. These new publications always tend to be published on a Friday and so sit in my ‘I’ll get to it when I can’ pile. However, I had been anticipating this particular one for a little while and it has a lot of excellent infographs produced by Oliver Caviglioli (@olivercavigliol) . As such I determined that I would read this particular offering by Tom Bennett (@tombennett71) over the weekend as soon as I could. I had also been considering changing the paradigm of behaviour management in my classroom since #PrimaryRocksLive and hearing the input from Paul Dix (@pivotalpaul) . More on that later.

I could not even begin to attempt to capture the whole of this comprehensive report in one blog and I would not do it justice. To read the excellent report (and I strongly suggest you do) then follow this link: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/behaviour-in-schools

I will attempt to highlight some key messages and thoughts and enhance this with my own evidence and ideas:

1. The Way we Do Things Around Here
Early on, Bennett states – “The key task for a school leader is to create a culture – usefully defined as ‘the way we do things around here’ – that is understood and subscribed to by the whole school community.” This is a vital part of making behaviour excellent in any school. The challenge here is that this is very dependent on the school leadership. If the school leadership do not set an example of how we expect things to be, always, then it will become more challenging for staff to enforce this in the classroom.

I have experienced this in both extremes. Fortuntaely I currently work at a school where there is very much an ethos of “this is our way, and we all will follow this way”. What this does is not only instil a feeling working together to make behaviour work around the school but as teachers we become empowered to drive home these principles in the classroom. We remind children “this is not what we expect at our school” and suddenly they recognise this ethos will be expected by all. Of course some will naturally not conform, but the vast majority will, and this is the first step to ensuring excellent behaviour across a school.

2. Behaviour Focus must come from higher than Heads

Despite the importance of the previous point, it is important to note that Bennett states that actually, the way behaviour will improve across the country is for the focus and resources to come from higher than Headteachers. He says his suggestions “…are designed to stimulate change and improvement in the field of school leadership for behaviour.” The Department for Education must make certain changes and provisions to make the biggest impact – which will have an impact on recruitment and retention (which in themselves are main focuses right now for the DfE).
The suggestions to the DfE can be found in the report on page 9-10 and are well worth a look and hopefully, as they commissioned the report, they will act on the advice.

3. Behaviour must be a priority for all

There are many pressures in education. Teachers, school leaders and other stakeholders in children’s education will all have different priorities. For some it’s developing the whole child. For others it is imparting as much knowledge as possible. Whatever an educator’s core value and goal, behaviour from those involved in the classroom will have an impact. Thus, research and effort into how to develop better behaviour in the classroom is important, necessary even.
“Whatever one believes the aim of education to be, all of these are best realised in schools where good behaviour is the norm, and antisocial, selfish, or self-destructive behaviour is minimised.”
All schools can take note of this. How do they address behaviour? Is there a robust, clear behaviour policy. Is there a valuable induction for new members of staff (not just teaching staff) so all understand “how we do things around here”? Who holds whole-school responsibility for behaviour, is there a Behaviour Lead? Is it necessary to have one person given the responsibility to plan and consider behaviour?

4. Is expecting good behaviour oppressive?

Fairly recently, I got caught into a brief discussion on Twitter. It happened when there was that uproar over (guess who…) the Michaela Academy deciding to recruit a ‘detention director’. Now, I felt that this was unusual but as was pointed out – if this is how they ensure behaviour is kept excellent then so what? Some tried to argue that this clearly shows Michaela have behaviour issues in school. However, as Bennett points out, the best schools address behaviour and make plans to act on it when behaviour is very good so the fact they wanted to recruit a ‘detention director’ is no indicator of poor behaviour.

Going back to the discussion I got pulled into – there was one line in the job description someone pulled out, about expecting obedience in school. Someone had an issue with this and I asked “When would you not expect obedience in a school?” Of course I got all sorts of answers (including, when a member of staff asks a child to join them in a quiet stock room and when a member of staff says they cannot go to the toilet despite the fact they are desperate) but of course we are talking about obedience to school rules here. Some teachers seem to feel that saying we expect obedience to all rules is oppressive but, to be openly frank here, this is why we have behaviour problems in school. Expecting good behaviour is not oppressive, it is surely standard in any school.

5. Behaviour thrives in complacency

Behaviour strategies are easy to implement, they are harder to maintain. I have seen this in the microcosm of my own classroom. I am only teaching in my third year but I have seen how if a behaviour management strategy is not kept relentlessly on top of, then it’s impact decreases dramatically. Think then how slippage can happen across a school. Another things I have noticed is how the effectiveness of some behaviour strategies decay naturally over time so keeping children on their toes is sometimes necessary.
Below if a diagram showing just *a few* elements of how behaviour can deteriorate in a school which can be found in Bennett’s report:

Behaviour Barriers(page 60 for the original image)

Thus, Bennett suggests all school leaders should take an audit on behaviour. Whilst self-auditing is a start, Bennett suggests the audit will be most effective when done cross-schools. If leaders look at all this practice-changing information and say, as Bennett suggested ‘they already do that…’ then they will miss out on improving the already-good behaviour system they have. The work has to be done when things are going well or not.

So now what?

Well, for me I knew I had to change. I was unfortunate to not go to #PrimaryRocksLive but I followed on the hashtag for quite a while and it was clear that Paul Dix’s presentation on behaviour was a shining highlight.

For me, the concept of faming good behaviour rather than shaming poor behaviour rung true. I and, from the reaction I read, many other practitioners do not fame good behaviour enough. So I took this on board, and magpied an excellent assembly idea from the influential Chris Dyson (@chrisdysonHT) who took the ‘Best Seats in the House’ concept from Ant and Dec’s Saturday Night Takeaway. Simply, the children win the ‘best seats’ through behaviour above and beyond what we expect. I applied this to my own classroom:

This has already evolved since Monday and now the children love it – the children chosen from the previous day get to do their learning in the best seats, they get a little reward (of a chocolatey nature) and they get to leave the class first for break, lunch and end of day. Most importantly, they are announced in the class and their behaviour is famed.

If a child wins it one day then shows above and beyond behaviour to win it the next day? So what?? They win it two days in a row. That blew some of my kid’s minds! How is that fair? I had questions – and I asked one back “Was their behaviour above and beyond yesterday again?” They have quickly learned only above and beyond will earn the exciting reward! Try it out and improve on what I’ve done – I’m sure there are better ways.

 

Influencing Others by @Mroberts90Matt

As part of my NPQML, may main task is to evidence that I have developed my leadership against certain ‘competencies’ of effective leadership. I was asked to share a 360 Diagnostic Review of my perceived leadership with leaders in my school context. One of my areas to focus on was ‘Influencing Others’.

Fast-forward several months and I have presented the main staff meeting to the majority of the staff about my initiative that I want to implement about Talk4Maths. Many steps have followed before – research, presenting to SLT, forming a team, trialling the Talk4Maths amongst other things. This was a massive learning experience for me. I’m sure some that read this will be very used to presenting about educational matters but this was my first time to try and influence others to act on what I was going on about in front of them. These are some of the things that I have learnt about trying to influence educational change:

1. Clear knowledge and understanding

One thing I recognised straight away was the need to know what I was talking about. I had become so convinced that the Talk4Maths strategy had an impact on children’s learning and would particularly be useful for our 80% of EAL learners in our school. However, it was important to demonstrate this certainty with a backing of theory and research which proved that. Not only that, but I had to convey this in a way that would make sense. I am very good at rushing through concepts because I am aware of them (a habit I had to curtail in my classroom practice in my teacher training).

2. Build a rapport

In our school we have had many speakers and consultants come and go and there is one thing that rings true from the best ones – they related to the listeners. I could have easily given a crystal-clear, knowledgeable presentation, faultless in knowledge and understanding but lost the audience. If I did not try to relate to the listeners then I would quickly be glazed over and the valuable learning I was trying to present would be wasted. It can be done very simply. For example, when I presented the training, we had not had a functioning colour printer for a few days – something that was becoming a running joke between the staff (it had to be a joke, otherwise we would be very annoyed). So, at a point in the training I gave a handout but of course the beautiful colour had been lost. I made a quick comment, they chuckled and we continued. Now, not the best joke but it showed a moment of togetherness, of ‘isn’t this silly right?’ which would have endeared…well maybe only one or two. This was not the only example but one that comes to mind.

3. Interactivity

I hate nothing more than a presentation where I sit and am talked at. We would condemn teachers that do this to children, so why would leaders in education who should be modelling excellent teaching and learning find it acceptable. Okay – the whole ‘teacher talk’ is different to staff CPD than it is in the classroom. ‘Teacher talk’ is required in staff CPD and teachers, as professionals, should be expected to listen and take in information attentively, no matter how little interaction there is. However, again the most memorable CPD I’ve had includes interactive activities, preferably demonstrating the concept or information we are trying to get to grips with.

As with most of my blog posts, there are probably more things that I’ve missed on my non-exhaustive list of things that help us influence others but I’d love to hear more from you!

Leadership/Management – A Continuum or Separate Skills by @Mroberts90Matt

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So – a quick one this week. I am intent on keeping up a weekly post but am now starting to flag with the depth of them.

Posted above I have pasted a model which was shared at a recent discussion on my NPQML course. It is a clear model which puts the relationship between leadership and management on a continuum. We were asked to reflect on our current roles and responsibilities in our setting and what we thought the majority of our time was spent on. The further to the left we place a cross and we are spending more of our time on management tasks than leadership tasks. The further to the right, then vice versa!

The question I have is this – can leadership and management be placed on a continuum? It quickly became apparent that we cannot view a leader being only focused on leadership skills or only on management skills. A leader who has leadership skills but no management has great ideas but cannot put them into action. A leader who has management skills but no leadership traits runs a very tight ship but that ship will have no direction and therefore no progress.

Thus, if we place leadership and management on a continuum, it suggests to me that these traits are a case of “either/or” rather than separate skills which a leader should select behaviours from in the right scenarios. Of course, some could argue that this continuum model does not indicate that leadership and management are skills that we choose “either/or” but it just analyses where a leader spends most of their time.

I don’t have a better solution but I feel that this can cause some confusion – particularly if used an a course which introduces new leaders to the debate of leadership and management. What happens from this is a group of new leaders who feel that a leader who spends some time on management tasks is not as an effective leader than one who spends all their time on leadership tasks. Although some would argue this is the case.

Well, hopefully you can make some sense out of that jumble of thoughts!

Leaders and/or Followers? by @Mroberts90Matt

Let’s begin on a real tangent – all the best blog posts I have read do! My wife and I love watching the programme ‘Impractical Jokers’. It’s a really good programme that you can just zone out with. The premise of the entire show is that it’s about four, very immature men in their 30’s who go around and get each other to do really embarrassing things. The other three are generally hooked up to an earpiece in their ear and they have to do and say what they are told. I could go into more detail but that is the general idea. It’s a really good programme to watch whilst marking work, doesn’t take a lot to follow it!

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Anyway, one particular challenge they like to do is give presentations about various things (could be first-aid, table manners, yoga…anything really) but the slides and activities have been planned by the other three. The person who gets the least votes on how good their presentation was by the (unaware) audience loses. As you can imagine, some ridiculous stuff is said and done but I’ve noticed something interesting (and here we get to my point). Usually one of two things happen. Either, no one votes to say they would take a class with them. The other thing that can happen is two or more people cast their vote. Hence, we see the necessity of leaders, but more importantly of followers.

The Leader 

Obviously for change to happen there has to be a leader. Without the leader, there is no vision, no end goal. It is the leader’s vision which drives what change is going to happen.

However, there is something we can learn from the Jokers mentioned. When one of them takes whatever appears on the slides they present in their stride, without any hesitation or chuckle (which I imagine is extremely difficult), they generally receive a more positive response. Basically, whatever crap they are saying, as long as they sound confident about the crap, then the people are more willing to accept the crap.

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Now, change in education is a much more sensitive subject. Different opinions fly, views are varied and children’s learning – the future of our society – is at stake. So at this point let me make it clear I am not suggesting any educational changes suggested today are crap (although, I’m sure many of you would not hesitate to label some initiatives so). However, it is possible to suggest whatever change in education to staff, and if the leader is passionate enough about the change and give evidence as to how to benefits learning, then it is possible to start turning a few heads.

Now of course, one does not initiate educational change just by turning heads. The likelihood is that those heads will turn back very quickly – teachers have lots to do! But, the leader must keep momentum. Once attention is grabbed from their evidence and passion, demonstrating how this change would look in practice is key – and this must be sustained, not slow down.

Eventually, one will follow. And one is all that’s needed…

The First Follower/Second Leader 

Let’s go back to the Jokers, because this is key to influencing change. I mentioned there is rarely only one person who votes. This is true. But I did not mention that, almost always, only one person puts their hand up first. This is the first follower. This is the key to making educational change possible. When the leader has done their bit and steps back, they must find that first follower, because it is them that changes that first “good idea” into “something we should do”.

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The leader’s role is not done yet though. They must celebrate this first follower. They must promote their great work. This will help not only the first follower feel validated in their decision but will make the act of following seem more enticing.

If this continues, then we see change…

Following followers 

I could make this analogy last longer but I think you get the idea. As a leader, you must plan for those you predict will follow. You know who they are in your school. Those who are happy to have students come and observe, those who are a beacon of positivity, those who are willing to try things out, to be the best they can be. If you are able to catch one of them, then change can happen.

Of course, this is a very complex path, all educational change is. Yet, recognising the value of the first follower will enable change to happen much more successfully.

To end this post, enjoy this clip which is what helped me to visualise this concept of the first follower much more easily!

photo credit: donielle <a href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/31925990@N00/23826853483″>IMG_0242</a&gt; via <a href=”http://photopin.com”>photopin</a&gt; <a href=”https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/”>(license)</a&gt;

To Those Who Support by @Mroberts90Matt

Well, I am sat in the Children’s Ward at my local hospital writing this – and what a roller coaster week it’s been. After committing to write more consistently on this blog and begin the final couple of weeks of my first term as an NQT with my mentor off sick until after Christmas – life struck.

My KS2 Department had gotten fully into a Pupil Progress Meeting looking at delightful data (and that wasn’t fully sarcastic – things are looking good) on the Thursday late afternoon when the Assistant Head’s phone rang and it was for me. It was my wife…Now my wife has only rung the school directly to speak to me once and that was to inform me she had been taken into hospital to have an emergency scan on our unborn daughter, so this was not promising. We had previously take E (my daughter) to the Walk-in Centre the previous night with what seemed to be a bad cold. Turns out she had progressively gotten worse that day to the point she had to be rushed into Hospital in a speeding ambulance! Needless to say, I was told to leave the Departmental by my Assistant Head and Head – it made things easier that, being in Year 6, I had already had 4 meetings on data for my Year Group previous to this meeting where, for Years 3-5, it was only the first one!

Fast-forward 5 days and ironically more sleep than usual, it looks like E will finally be able to come home at some point tomorrow, or by the latest Thursday, all being well. Why do I share this? Whilst I know I have avid readers of my educational blog (not), it is not my intention to regularly update whoever reads this with my life story (my wife does enough of that on her blog)! Neither is it an attempt by me to release all the tension I’ve been feeling for the past few days to poor souls who will take the time to read.

No, this, as mentioned before, is an educational blog and whilst, since starting my NQT Year, it has had a significant drop in posts, I felt it necessary to force myself back on after this torrid week to do one thing – thank my school leadership and colleagues. My school is currently in a state of shift and so as an NQT I have felt I need to be there – not just to help my Year 6 class achieve what I know they can achieve – but to help the school have a great year in it’s progress as well. I was ill one day last week (E must have caught it off all of us as we were ill previously) and subsequently have had to take Friday last week (which was an INSET fortunately) and Monday-Weds this week off.

Now, some of you may be saying ‘That’s no time at all!’ or ‘Your leadership would have to be monsters to be unhappy with you taking that time off with your daughter!’. I, however, do not like letting anyone down. The past 5 days have felt like an eternity (which I guess is not surprising given the circumstances) so all I could think about, in terms of work was, the need to get supply cover, kids not having consistency…all the things the school would have to deal with me not being there. And yet, have I been made to feel at all bad? Have the Heads at any stage asked me when I think the earliest I’ll be in is? If anything, when I said I WILL be in on Thursday they said “Well, we really appreciate that but we will make sure nearer the time – you focus on your family.”

I am sure that some school leaders would have grumbled. I am sure that some leaders would (and I’m applying this to all leaders outside of education too) make some comment, maybe inadvertently, which showed the extra problems this sudden leave of absence would cost. But not mine. They have been a support all the way through. And this has allowed me to do one thing – focus on supporting my wonderful wife, my tremendous toddler and my bright, beautiful baby girl. Today – she smiled for the first time since she became ill last Weds really – and a tear came to my eye. I had been there pretty much every step of the way – from the fraught first moments in the emergency room when her blood oxygen dropped to 70%, to the heartbreak when she had to have almost a dozen tubes strapped to her face, nose and body, to the clear lethargy she had to endure for most of the week, to the hunger she clearly felt despite not being able to feed and then finally, to that bright, cheerful smile. I was there – thank to those who supported me to allow me to leave my work for a little while and focus solely on my loved ones.

If my school had complained, would I be returning a happy employee who would do anything to support the school? No. But I will be…

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photo credit: <a href=”https://www.flickr.com/photos/shannonkringen/4786965539/”>shannonkringen</a&gt; via <a href=”http://photopin.com”>photopin</a&gt; <a href=”http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/”>cc</a&gt;